Be Anxious for Nothing

The truth is we all have fears.
Most often, we are consumed by our fears, and justly so sometimes..
Some of our fears are quite valid. A fear of the unknown; the mere fact that we cannot physically see beyond the immediate presence almost tears us apart.
How we wish we can see into the future… not just some mental pictures or dream or trance or looking forward with the ‘eye of faith’ seeing. But actually seeing the future as it really is. Like having your life presented to you as a recorded movie – you can see how far you’ve come, and despite all you’re going through presently, you see that the future is just beautiful and there’s no stopping you from getting there. How we wish…
So we fear!
But why fear? When has worry changed anything?
It is recorded in the bible that the phrase ‘fear not’ appears almost 365 times… That’s an approximate one for each day of the year…
So fear not… Be anxious for nothing… Your every worry has never and would never add a tittle to your height…

In the face of all your fears, be courageous enough to live… Face the fear…

Face the thing you fear and the death of that fear is certain…

In concluding, there would always be fears… New challenges would always bring new fears…

But do one thing only; do the thing you fear!!!!

This is a writing assignment put together in less than 10 minutes with minimal thoughts…
So lemme know what you think.
Thanks

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The pains and gains of social media

The social media has come to be a part of our lives, and has indeed changed the way everything is being done nowadays.
However, it’s not unusual once in a while to still find people in the perennial argument of whether the Internet has caused more harm than good? In fact, a few days ago one of my friends was told to speak on the topic “the Internet is man’s worst enemy”… The debate continues, and both sides of the divide continually reel out points in Cavour of their chosen motion.

Today, I would play the devil’s advocate.

Personally, I’m at a loss as to whether to claim gains, or rather pains from social media. Truth is I can hardly imagine a lifestyle without the influence of social media… It’s more or less difficult for me to imagine a week without tweeting, updating my Facebook status, relating on BBM or whatsapp, putting up a blogpost, etc… All these have become a recurrent theme of my life, and helps me share momenta and lessons from my own daily activities with a many that care. That much I consider a gain.
But I would not fail to forget my early days on social media… In fact, days when it was yet to be as popular as it is now – at least not around here. I remember my days of addiction to wap sites, chat rooms, and overnight calls following the escapades from chat rooms earlier in the day.
In my personal reckoning, I have always maintained that these days cost me an additional academic year because I make myself believe that I could have channeled those hours to additional studies that might have, amongst other things, gotten me a better result in a particular exams…

Looking back however, I would not say I in anyway regret those days… I indeed very grateful for those delays and I’m actually really enjoying my days on social media presently…

I mean, there were days when my activities on social media was deemed a nuisance to some people, but these days, that same nuisance is being paid for… and I also get to volunteer my time on social media for other causes like live feed of events, etc.

So depending on how you look at it, social media has its pains… but I bet to say the gains are rather enormous!!!

This is a writing assignment put together in about 10 – 12 minutes with minimal pre-thoughts…
So lemme know what you think.
Thanks

21st century beggars: a peculiar Lagos experience

Not too long ago, the Lagos state government deported certain beggars to their home states and there was a whole lot of hullabaloo as a result of that.
My intention is not to revisit that sourly event or even the ridiculous apology and politicking that followed, not at all… But I intend to discuss a new form of begging – in a rather civilized and cultural way; beggars who I think no state government can possibly deport.

It would surprise you to know that begging has taken a whole new sophisticated level in recent times, and you would be astounded by the calibre of people that can now be safely regarded to as BEGGARS without any sense of apology to the word.

I tried as much as possible not to write this piece, but I had to succumb following the barrage of encounter I have had with these beggars in the last couple of days.

The begging mentality has successfully ingrained itself into our culture such that it has now become a norm, and consequently it is an anathema not to give in to these beggars.

From the policeman, to the gateman, to virtually anybody who thinks they deserve to get a stipend from you for no obvious reason of course, the list of beggars is endless…

It’s funny how the gateman quickly assumes anyone that drives through the gate is better than him and as such deserves to give him some stipend for the weekend, something for the festivities, etc.

The security guard or porter believes every student is definitely richer than him and must give him something.

The policeman/traffic warden stops in traffic and approaches a Jeep, of course expecting the occupant to part with some stipends for him.

I’m personally bewildered by this beggar mentality that’s now common place in our society. It is a big part of a culture of undue subservience even in corporate settings.

I remember someone sharing with me recently and comparing the nature or attitudes of stewards, security guards and gatemen in corporate settings in Johannesburg and Lagos, having lived in both cities. He was quick to mention the absence of this undue subservience and beggarly attitude among such workers in Johannesburg, and I totally agree with him.

As I conclude, I have not in any way insinuated that giving is bad. I’m only troubled by a mentality that makes our people think they’re inferior and expect hand-me-downs from some more superior persons… As a people, we must put an end to this kind of mentality and begin to embrace one that promotes self dignity and confidence among each and every one of us…
Let’s together say NO to beggar mentality…

21st century beggars: a peculiar Lagos experience

Not too long ago, the Lagos state government deported certain beggars to their home states and their was a whole lot of hullabaloo as a result of that.
My intention is not to revisit that sourly event or even the ridiculous apology and politicking that followed, not at all… But I intend to discuss a new form of begging – in a rather civilized and cultural way; beggars who I think no state government can possibly deport.

It would surprise you to know that begging has taken a whole new sophisticated level in recent times, and you would be astounded by the calibre of people that can now be safely regarded to as BEGGARS without any sense of apology to the word.

I tried as much as possible not to write this piece, but I had to succumb following the barrage of encounter I have had with these beggars in the last couple of days.

The begging mentality has successfully ingrained itself into our culture such that it has now become a norm, and consequently it is an anathema not to give in to these beggars.

From the policeman, to the gateman to virtually anybody who thinks they deserve to get a stipend from for no obvious reason of course, the list of beggars is endless…

It’s funny how the gateman quickly assumes anyone that drives through the gate is better than him and as such deserves to give him some stipend for the weekend, something for the festivities, etc.

The security guard or porter believe every student is definitely richer than him and must give him something.

The policeman/traffic warden stops in traffic and approaches a Jeep, of course expecting the occupant to part with some stipends for him.

I’m personally bewildered by this beggar mentality that’s now common place in our society. It is a big part of a culture of undue subservience even in corporate settings.

I remember someone sharing with me recently and comparing the nature or attitudes of stewards, security guards and gatemen in corporate settings in Johannesburg and Lagos, having lived in both cities. He was quick to mention the absence of this undue subservience and beggarly attitude among such workers in Johannesburg, and I totally agree with him.

As I conclude, I have not in any insinuated that giving is bad. I’m only troubled by a mentality that makes our people think they’re inferior and expect hand-me-downs from some more superior persons… As a people, we must put an end to this kind of mentality and begin to embrace one that promotes self dignity and confidence among each and every one of us…
Let’s together say NO to beggar mentality…